Tagged: dragonlance

I’m relatively new to art appreciation.  A big turning point for me was a few years back when I read John Milton’s Paradise Lost.  Since then, my appreciation for art and the artists behind the work has continued to grow.  I even have some Peter Max limited edition prints hanging on my walls.

I’m a huge fan of fantasy art and pretty much any game art coming out of TSR in the 1980s.  There is something about the oil on canvas, seeing the stroke of the brush—which for me sort of elevates the work.  I’m not complaining about the perfection found in digital painting—just that I like the “handmade” quality brush strokes bring.

Archmage Rises is a love letter to tabletop role-playing games.  The art style is ’80s TSR for the modern area.

Seriously awesome! (more…)

I have some very exciting news to share!  Not being able to talk about it has been killing me for the last four weeks—but now the contract is signed, and I can (finally) scream from the top of my lungs. Are you ready?

In my first dev blog, I shared my personal journey and why I was moving from mobile to PC game development. It kind of took off. The article was #1 on Gamasutra for 3 days straight and soon blew past 100 comments. (It now sits at a little over 200.)

Yeah, I still can’t believe I beat out that Blizzard article.  And I LIKED their article.

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Sometimes a new solution is just an old idea in a new package.

Last time, I covered how re-reading the Dragonlance novels got me thinking about a new kind of RPG.  One that is a realistic open world, procedurally-generated, and full of meaningful choices.  The question is: How can I build it? Is it even possible?

Shark Tank is a TV show where prospective entrepreneurs (fish) pitch their business ideas to industry titans (sharks).  After one of these pitches, Kevin (the grumpy Simon type billionaire on the show) asked, “Which is more important: The idea or the execution?”

Thinking for a minute, the entrepreneur nervously answered “Execution.”

“Right answer,” said Kevin.  And he proceeded to invest in the idea.

I had a solid idea, but I wasn’t so sure about how to execute it.  If I want to allow the player true choice, I have to address the cost of choice head on.  I found the answer in two places: another TV show . . . and the early ‘90s.

Cost of Player Choice

There is one reason why the same characters die at the same time both in my playthrough and yourplaythrough of Watch Dogs: cost.  Video game budgets now eclipse movies by a considerable margin—leading to less relevant choices.

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